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Randy Pausch

"Time is a funny thing. It’s technically relative, but I’m not just saying that because of Einstein’s theories. On some days, it’s a drag; others, it passes relentlessly. The average life span of a human being is 79 years. The real question, however, is “Are we truly living?” If you spontaneously combusted, would you consider a life truly fulfilled?

Watch this video to get some clarity:

Rest in peace, Randy Pausch. He tells us to never pass up on an opportunity. Seems easy, doesn’t it? But think about it. Did you ever ask that girl out? Did you enroll in that class you thought seemed interesting? Experience is the stairway to success. Step out of your comfort zone, go crazy, do the thing that scares you and then you’ll know that you’re doing something right. Fear is just a four-letter word. Believe you have it in you to overcome it. Loosen up on the contemplation and get out there. Live your life.

 

Randy talks about working hard and finding your passion. Work hard for what? A good college? A job? Family? What I have come to realize is that you can only ever feel truly fulfilled if you find your passion. Until then the phrase “working hard” remains just that, something so abstract people can never ever find it.

 

That rush that you get from watching a movie, reading a book, or delivering a musical performance? Don’t let it pass, work on it. Just go out and make the most of it. It’s easier said than done, but to be your best self, you have to search for your passion. Life is a tiny cage waiting to be broken out of. Never accept the shackles, never stop doing."

 

The Last Lecture – Randy Pausch

The reason we've featured him here is because he met his battles long after finding his passion and being successful at exhibiting them. Randolph Frederick "Randy" Pausch was an American professor of computer science, human–computer interaction, and design at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pennsylvania. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in September 2006, and in August 2007, he was given a terminal diagnosis: "3 to 6 months of good health left". He gave an upbeat lecture titled "The Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams" in September 2007, he then co-authored a book called The Last Lecture on the same theme."